Promoting a Culture of Peer Career Support

Leaders:

Justin Stoler, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Geography and Regional Studies

Type: Practice Events

Date: TBD

Purpose:

This is to promote a culture of peer career support among early-career academics, particularly tenure-track faculty and advanced doctoral students. Although SEEDS has historically sponsored several mentoring-related activities, few have explicitly focused on early-career faculty and job-seeking doctoral students, who often experience some of the most stressful work environments in higher education. UM’s informal mentoring programs match new tenure-track hires with senior faculty in their departments, but this arrangement is often inadequate for hires from new subfields, or in rapidly evolving disciplines. Peer support among early-career faculty can foster more trusting collaborative and mentorship relationships when both parties share similar professional landscapes and life stages. There is no formal platform for these types of interactions at UM, and a January 2018 survey of junior UM faculty(supported by a prior SEEDS award) revealed wide variation in satisfaction with faculty mentoring, knowledge of university resources, and career track transparency. But with PRACTICE, we can infuse a culture of support and maximize research outcomes while also promoting interdisciplinarity, collegiality, and job satisfaction among future academic leaders.

Activity Goals:

To offer two series of PRACTICEworkshops during 2019-2020, three for early-career faculty, and three for doctoral students(six total). The topics have been refined over the last couple of years through informal events with the target audience: (1) Building Your Mentoring Network; (2) Maximizing ResearchEfficiency; and (3) Career Advancement (focuses on promotion for early-career faculty, and job-seeking for doctoral students). These sessions will provide safe, interdisciplinary spaces for early-career academics to freely discuss their experiences and help each other navigate job expectations. The sessions work best in a panel format, and I already have commitments from several early-and mid-career faculty from across multiple colleges. We would offer events on different day/time combinations to accommodate teaching schedules, travel, and childcare responsibilities (among other factors) which significantly limit participation. I have also developed slide handouts for each topic that contain useful success strategies sourced from across the country.

Culture of the College: Increasing Interactions

Leaders:

Jennifer Ferris-Hill, Ph.D.
Professor

Maria G. Stampino, Ph.D.
Professor

Type: Interactive Workshop

Date: TBD

Purpose:

This is to promote a culture of peer career support among early-career academics, particularly tenure-track faculty and advanced doctoral students. Although SEEDS has historically sponsored several mentoring-related activities, few have explicitly focused on early-career faculty and job-seeking doctoral students, who often experience some of the most stressful work environments in higher education. UM’s informal mentoring programs match new tenure-track hires with senior faculty in their departments, but this arrangement is often inadequate for hires from new subfields, or in rapidly evolving disciplines. Peer support among early-career faculty can foster more trusting collaborative and mentorship relationships when both parties share similar professional landscapes and life stages. There is no formal platform for these types of interactions at UM, and a January 2018 survey of junior UM faculty(supported by a prior SEEDS award) revealed wide variation in satisfaction with faculty mentoring, knowledge of university resources, and career track transparency. But with PRACTICE, we can infuse a culture of support and maximize research outcomes while also promoting interdisciplinarity, collegiality, and job satisfaction among future academic leaders.

Activity Goals:

  • Allow more senior faculty (those with more longevity at UM) to share their expertise;
  • Concurrently, allow newer faculty and instructors to share their experience with their more senior colleagues;
  • Get new instructors to interact with each other and with a larger group, and profit from more senior faculty’s experience;
  • Cut across disciplinary boundaries;
  • Shake things up with respect to the prevailing culture, especially our professed twin mission of teaching and research that often results in a putting down of teaching;
  • Help all faculty recognize the complexity of our institution and the role they play within the College and UM;
  • Demystify many processes;
  • Allow newly appointed instructors to see beyond their units;
  • Get faculty to know others as people, not simply as colleagues.

We take “diversity” to include disciplines, ranks, professional profiles (TT vs NTT faculty), and intellectual goals (some are appointed to conduct research, others to advance the pedagogical mission of the College and University). We want to remedy the frequent split between “those who teach” (and teach a lot: 4 classes/term) and “those who don’t” (typically, TT faculty). This often results in lecturers feeling like second-class citizens; it isolates junior faculty members who express an interest in pedagogical issues; it does not promote cross-fertilization among disciplines; it squanders the historical knowledge accumulated by more senior faculty; it does not recognize the creativity that most instructors harbor when it comes to course-related activities; it allows a culture of “this is the way it’s done at UM” to prosper and affect newer generations of faculty. Furthermore, these groups would provide long-term perspectives on personal careers and on work-life balance to faculty on a tenure track, who might be hesitant to address these types of issues with their “official” (departmental) mentors.

Navigating Fieldwork: Intersectional Identities and Personal Safety

Leaders:

Kapriekie Seide, MPH
Ph.D. Candidate

Kathryn Nowotny, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

Type: Research Forum

Date: Friday, October 25, 2019

Purpose:

This interactive Research Forum will include a moderated discussion and Q&A with guest panelists Drs. Alice Cepeda and Avelardo Valdez from the University of Southern California. Focusing on the perspective of the researcher, the panelists will reflect on their extensive experience conducting research with marginalized and “at-risk” groups in the US and Mexico. The purpose of this event is to discuss topics related to field safety, including 1. Navigating a minority identity or status while in the field; 2. Maintaining physical and emotional safety; and 3. Conducting Research in risk-prone areas or with risk-prone populations. 

Activity Goals:

Equally, in the past, junior faculty training typically lacked training in how to maintain scholarly productivity while managing increasing professional and personal time demands. This is the past that current faculty leaders of the Department of Biology were trained in. Biology faculty leaders are eager for opportunities to improve our abilities to maintain and grow vibrant, productive scholarly lives. Membership of the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity will provide Biology faculty leaders with opportunities to achieve extraordinary writing and research productivity while leading full lives on and off-campus.

National Institute of Faculty Development and Diversity

Leaders:

Alexandra Wilson, Ph.D.
Professor

Type: Membership

Date: Ongoing 

Purpose:

In the past, graduate training lacked instruction in planning, time management, mentoring and team science. Equally, in the past, junior faculty training typically lacked training in how to maintain scholarly productivity while managing increasing professional and personal time demands. This is the past that current faculty leaders of the Department of Biology were trained in. Biology faculty leaders are eager for opportunities to improve our abilities to maintain and grow vibrant, productive scholarly lives. Membership of the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity will provide Biology faculty leaders with opportunities to achieve extraordinary writing and research productivity while leading full lives on and off-campus.

Activity Goals:

The National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity’s core curriculum offers training in strategic planning, development of daily writing habits, mastering of academic time management, balancing of professional and personal life, cultivation of relationships with mentors and collaborators, overcoming academic perfectionism, how to engage in healthy conflict, and how to manage stress, rejection, and haters. The goal of the program is to teach people how to thrive in academia.

Statistical Approaches for MRI Research 

Leaders:

Jason Nomi, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor

Type: Workshop

Date: Monday, April 20, 2019

Purpose:

Currently, advances in statistical approaches for MRI research have produced novel multi-variate analyses that characterize relationships between brain data and behavioral data. The current proposal aims to bring a prominent multi-variate MRI analysis expert to UM to foster interdisciplinary discussion and research between cognitive neuroscientists, quantitative psychologists, engineers, and computer scientists who use complex multivariate analysis techniques on extremely large sets of data.

Activity Goals:

To bring awareness to the community of cognitive neuroscientists at UM and to foster interdisciplinary cooperation with quantitative researchers who are interested in applying multi-variate "big data" analysis techniques to characterizing brain function. This will help to bring attention to the growing community of neuroimaging researchers at the University of Miami.

Early-Career Grant Writing

Leaders:

Courtney Dumont, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

Type: Workshop

Date: TBD

Purpose:

The ability to craft a successful grant application is an underdeveloped skill for most early-career researchers. With the low federal funding rate, it is increasingly challenging for young faculty to secure extramural support and for more senior members to maintain continued support. It is critical to have a clear and concise presentation of research ideas to engage reviewers and ensure that it is accessible to a wide range of experts. In the field of Biomedical Engineering, the accessibility to multidisciplinary experts is a challenge as the nuance with a disease or an injury paradigm may be unknown to the reviewer, making our inhouse experts the ideal candidates. The goal of this proposal is to improve extramural funding rates, particularly for early-career researchers, through in-house review panels and one-on-one discussions with an NIH Program Director.

Activity Goals:

This SEEDS proposal seeks to address some of the limitations of a university-wide program by providing mock review panels comprised of a more representative expert panel that is capable of speaking to the scientific merit and experimental design. The Department of Biomedical Engineering is comprised of Principal Investigators from disparate fields of basic and translation research with many senior faculty members that have served extensively on review panels at the state and federal level. Our strength comes from housing "expert reviewers" that are from seemingly disparate fields of study similar to the composition of reviewers that may sit on a panel for the NIG National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, to which many of our early-career faculty submit proposals. 

Implicit Bias Training for Information Professionals”

Leaders:

Zsuzsanna Nemeth, MLIS
Associate Professor

Roxane Pickens, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

Type: Interactive Workshop

Date: March 9, 2020

Purpose:

This course will provide participants with an overview of implicit bias, the impact it has on libraries and in health care, and more importantly how it stands in the way of diversity and inclusion. Implicit biases are likely a contributing factor to the lack of diversity in librarianship as it may impact who gets hired, which programs and collections get funded, and which services are offered. In this interactive session, instructors will define implicit bias, provide examples of what it looks like in the workplace, and offer strategies that librarians may use to identify and consciously mediate their own biases.

Activity Goals:

Implicit bias occurs when we have attitudes towards people or associate stereotypes with them without our conscious knowledge. As the demographic makeup of US communities continues to change it's imperative that the library workforce reflects the communities being served. A number of contributing factors have been identified that impact the lack of racial and ethnic diversity in the profession. Growing research indicates that implicit biases impact the setting, implicit biases are likely a contributing factor to the lack of diversity in librarianship as it likely impacts who gets hired, which programs and collections get funded, and which services are offered. In this interactive session, course instructors will define implicit bias, provide examples of what it looks like in the workplace, and offer strategies that librarians may use to identify and consciously mediate their own biases. 

Neurology Trainee Career Development Lecture Series

Leaders:

Nichol Beaton Sur, M.D.
Associate Professor

Type: Lecture Series

Date: Various

Purpose:

Despite improvements in diversity and inclusion efforts in academic medicine, women and under-represented minorities continue to face barriers related to career advancement. One crucial factor is the lack of mentorship and concrete guidance for navigating the complexities of career development at the trainee level. Neurology trainees face intense clinical demands, and the academic curriculum is primarily focused on mastering clinical medicine. Less formal teaching is provided regarding career building. Career advice is often gleaned informally through non-uniform interactions with other physicians. We seek funding to launch a unique Neurology Trainee Career Development Lecture Series at the Miller School of Medicine, Department of Neurology to provide streamlined, concrete, and personalized career guidance for our diverse residents and fellows.

Activity Goals:

The overarching goal of the Neurology Trainee Career Development Lecture Series is to provide neurology trainees with the career planning tools they need to becomes successful, influential, and satisfied neurologists. The main objectives are as follows: 

  1. Provide concrete guidance and resources to facilitate career planning and development for neurology trainees. 
  2. Assist trainees with the development of successful mentorship with neurology faculty. 
  3. Enhance diversity and inclusion in the field of neurology
  4. Promote retention of successful and diverse trainees. 

Systematized Program for Women Students and Residents

Leaders:

Hilit Mechaber, M.D.
Associate Dean for Student Services

Type: Workshop Series

Date: Various

Purpose:

The plan is to implement a systematized program providing women students and residents with resources and education to promote their professional development as they establish their careers in medicine. This program will consist of three workshops spread longitudinally throughout the 2019-2020 academic year, each with a focus on the following core topics: (1) interpersonal skills, navigating communication differences, and identifying and overcoming gender bias, (2) recognizing implicit bias, securing mentorship and sponsorship, and silencing self-doubt and imposter syndrome, and (3) financial advice and negotiating skills for trainees.

Activity Goals:

The overall goal of this professional development course for women trainees, sponsored by AWMA and AWS and SEEDS and UMMSM, is to support the advancement of women through an interactive series that promotes advocacy, education, and networking opportunities. This workshop series will expose medical students and trainees to available professional development opportunities both locally and nationally, and provide them with essential information to succeed in the field as future leaders in academic medicine. These resources will provide additional support toward achieving future career success in the sciences. This series is imperative to also helping promote a diverse and growing UM Faculty. We recognize that institutional support for career advancement programming can lead to increased opportunity for retention of current women trainees, and potentially our students as well, as they graduate and consider matching into UMMSM residency programs. We aim to see program participants put the knowledge gained into future practice, which will benefit their personal growth as well as our institution. 

Guiding Mid-Career and Junior Women Faculty 

Leaders:

Rose Maria van Zuilen, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Professional Practice

Type: Workshop Series

Date: Various

Purpose:

Recruitment, retention, and promotion of women in academic medicine and how to support women faculty requires a greater focus on ensuring the advancement of women’s careers. The National Institute of Health is focusing on nationwide programs that assist women in clinical and biomedical sciences with overcoming career advancement barriers by creating a supportive community for female faculty to ensure full participation in their field and career success. By supporting and promoting the careers of women in medicine, we can prevent those in the workforce from leaving and encourage those who aspire to hold leadership positions during their careers. Women in medicine programs play a critical role in supporting women’s careers and can improve recruitment and retention of women by providing opportunities for networking, sponsorship, mentorship, and career development. The Women in Academic Medicine’s (WIAM) focus on organizing initiatives for faculty leadership development and mentoring would guide mid-career and junior women faculty members in a more significant forum. Additionally, WIAM seeks to learn from other institutions that have robust programs to support women scientists and clinicians. Having their leaders come to share their experiences and strategies will help advance the goals of WIAM. The projected activities will include targeted meetings with institutional leadership and stakeholder groups and workshops with opportunities for mentoring and networking.

Activity Goals:

The overall goal of the professional development proposal is to support the career advancement of women by providing them with mentoring and educational resources that will assist them in overcoming the challenges faced by under-represented groups in the clinical and biomedical fields. Recently, through a C-Change needs assessment survey administered by the Office of the Dean results demonstrated that both clinical and research women faculty are interested in more professional and career development opportunities to advance their careers. 

Exposing Trainees to Early Career Successful Women Scientist

Leaders:

Laura Bianchi
Professor of Physiology and Biophysics

Type: TBD

Date: TBD

Purpose:

About 50% of the trainees in the field of biomedical science across disciplines are female. However, the number of women occupying higher ranks is striking lower. The scarcity of women scientists at higher ranks makes it harder for female trainees to find mentors that they can relate to. I am proposing here to invite early-career women faculty for seminars and mentoring events. In 2009 I received a SEEDS award to invite well-established women scientists for similar types of events. This proposal is different in that it aims at bringing in women who have just made the transition to faculty with the idea of gaining a fresh perspective on the challenges women face and the solutions.

Activity Goals:

To bring in three women scientist who have moved into their first faculty position within the last three years for seminars and mentoring events:
  1. Seminars will be organized over a span of 1.5 years and will be advertised across the three campuses. 
  2. Before the arrival of the speaker, there will be a Journal Club in which we will present one of the recent papers from the invited speakers and we will briefly discuss the expertise and career path of the invited speaker.
  3. The seminar presentations will expose trainees to cutting edge research conducted by women.
  4. Following the seminar, the invited speaker will meet for an informal lunch with students and postdocs during which the trainees will have the opportunity to ask career-related questions including how to apply for a faculty position, how to develop negotiating skills, how to balance family and career and to learn to manage time and priorities. 

Mentoring Dynamics and Negotiating for Success

Leaders:

Amy Clement, Ph.D.
Professor of Atmospheric Sciences

Type: Workshop 

Date: March 20, 2020

Purpose:

Proposed two mentoring workshops designed to identify common issues from the perspective of both graduate students and faculty and then provide powerful strategies for improving mentor-mentee relationships. The workshops will also focus on how building robust mentoring relationships will advance the culture of the school. We have developed the goals and content of the workshop in collaboration with Merlin Walberg, a professional consultant in coaching and leadership training (Phoenix Consultancy). A skilled facilitator is crucial to the success of an event like this, where we have only a few days to make a difference, yet it is a significant commitment for busy faculty.

Activity Goals:

  1. To understand mentoring as a proactive, interpersonal relationship 
  2. To provide practical skills and tools for mentoring
  3. To identify and achieve a health power dynamic
  4. To identify connections between mentoring relationships and the transformation of culture
  5. To identify ways to continue the momentum for further improvement of RSMAS culture. 

Avoiding Low-Promotability Tasks

Leaders:

Miriam Lipsky, Ph.D.
Assistant Provost

Clair Oueslati-Porter, Ph.D.
Senior Lecturer

Type: Workshop 

Date: February 28, 2020

Purpose:

Research has shown that relative to men, women spend more time on low-promotability tasks and less time on high-promotability tasks (Babcock, Recalde, & Vesterlunde, 2017). In a research-oriented university such as UM, this has real implications for women faculty who are seeking tenure and promotion. Women are more likely to be asked to take on “housekeeping” tasks, and more likely to take on such tasks when asked (Babcock et al., 2017). We would like to use an interactive theater group to create a series of workplace scenarios that realistically depict these demands for “housekeeping” tasks and allow participants to learn how to diplomatically and assertively decline these types of tasks in order to protect their time.

Activity Goals:

In this workshop, we will create a short presentation that shares some of the existing research on the disproportionality of women, and particularly women of color, who are asked to take on low-value tasks that have been categorized as "office housekeeping" tasks. These include such things as taking notes at meetings, serving on certain committees, planning office events such as holiday parties, setting up and cleaning before and after office events, purchasing food for birthday celebrations, etc. While these tasks may be important for various reasons, the fact that women are asked (or in some cases expected) to take on these tasks is problematic. These "housekeeping" tasks take away previous time from more valuable activities which can actually lead to promotion and tenure. 

 

Re-Envisioning SEHD Partnership for Engaged Secondary Science Education

Leaders:

Mary Avalos, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor

Laura Kohn-Wood, Ph.D.
Dean

Type: Workshop 

Date: March 17, 2020

Purpose:

This project explores how science is taught in secondary classrooms serving diverse 6th-12th grade students. We seek to identify 1) the obstacles/challenges of engaging secondary students with science content to better understand the link between access, equity, and opportunity to learn across diverse populations, 2) to disseminate study findings via a UM School of Education and Human Development (SEHD) film screening and panel presentation in order to discuss the current state of science instruction and suggest innovative partnership models to promote engaged secondary science instruction, and 3) ways in which the SEHD will need to re-envision community partnerships to engage and equip all students for science learning. By meeting and documenting the three objectives, UM’s SEHD will highlight the need for instruction that goes beyond a “one-size-fits-all” approach to secondary science learning. This will inform the public and education legislators at all levels concerning the need to implement and support new and innovative partnerships to equip and prepare all secondary students for science majors in college.

Activity Goals:

This project aims to build on a larger funded study to investigate: 1. How are science subjects taught within local secondary classrooms? and 2. How might secondary science instructions and community partnership change to promote, attract, and enable all students to seek science majors and careers, regardless of race, ethnicity, or gender? As the UM SEHD celebrates its 90th anniversary, the purpose of public schools continues to evolve and shift. Future work much cut across institutional boundaries and build capacity for partnership with community leaders, completely overhauling relationships between universities and school to not only impact teacher training but produce changes in K-12 schools, as well.